Posted on September 21st, 2016 by Frederik

Curtis Hanson, who directed Toni Collette and Cameron Diaz in 2005’s “In her Shows, has died. Hanson was probably best known for 1997’s “L.A. Confidential”, which was nominated for nine Oscars, including for best picture and best director and won for Best Supporting Actress and Best Adapted Screenplay (Mr. Hanson and his co-writer, Brian Helgeland). As Sasha Stone at AwardsDaily wrote earlier today, he was also a director of great women. Hanson had an ability to bring out fierce performances in his actresses – from Kim Basinger, who won an Oscar in LA Confidential, to the absolutely fantastic Rebecca De Mornay in the Hand that Rocks the Cradle. She should have gotten an Oscar nomination for that movie. And what can you say about The River Wild except that it’s a much better movie than it’s been given credit for, thank in large part to Meryl Streep – but also Hanson was a good director of thrillers, usually those that revolved around female characters, but he also directed 8 Mile with Eminem which came close to getting a Best Picture nomination. Edit: Toni Collette released a statement on Mr. Hanson’s passing on her Instagram account:

Oh Curtis, I am so lucky to have worked with you and known your friendship. The greatest director. The most curious and beautiful mind. You were a great liver of life and will always inspire me. I’ll miss you. I hope wherever you are it’s widescreen…

Posted on September 8th, 2016 by Frederik

No reservations are required for the upcoming comedy Fun Mom Dinner, which stars Toni Collette, Molly Shannon, Bridget Everett, and Katie Aselton as four wildly different mothers whose kids share a preschool class. When this unlikely quartet decides to meet up for a casual dinner, things quickly devolve into an evening of debauchery — and weed-fueled karaoke performances. That means at least one heartfelt ‘80s singalong, as seen in the exclusive photo above. “It’s so easy to lump them into a generic ‘mum’ category,” says Collette, whose character is raising four young boys. “But they’re all strikingly different, and they all go out on this night together with varying degrees of reluctance and willingness.”Not unlike this summer’s breakout hit Bad Moms, Fun Mom Dinner is the latest comedy about mothers behaving badly and the idea that — shocker! — there’s not one way to be the perfect mom.

“When you have kids, you’re still the same person you were — except you have kids! Moms are not all the same people!” Collette says, laughing. “Every single human being is different, and I think having a child enriches your life, but you still maintain your sense of self, or struggle with that. And that’s part of this [movie] as well.” A few non-moms round out the cast, including Adam Scott, Adam Levine, Rob Huebel, and Paul Rust, but it’s mostly a female affair, including writer Julie Yaeger Rudd and first-time feature director Alethea Jones. June Pictures and Gettin’ Rad Productions produced. “People were actually wetting themselves from laughing so much at work,” Collette says. “I hadn’t experienced that in the past.” Fun Mom Dinner is out next year.

Posted on August 26th, 2016 by Frederik

The Guardian has an exciting first review on “Jasper Jones”. Craig Silvey’s 2009 coming-of-age novel has enjoyed a recent renaissance, with Kate Mulvany’s stage adaptation seeing three separate productions in as many years: at Perth’s Barking Gecko in 2014; at Sydney’s Belvoir Theatre earlier this year; now at Melbourne Theatre Company, where it runs until 1 September. But it was a feature film adaptation that premiered to an enthusiastic home field audience on Wednesday night at the opening of Western Australian film festival CinefestOz, in Busselton. Set in the fictional town of Corrigan, the film, directed by Rachel Perkins – who previously made Bran Nue Dae – was shot in the WA town of Pemberton with funds from ScreenWest, and is projected for release in early 2017. With its child’s eye view of small town racial prejudice, publicity for Silvey’s book was quick to label it the Australian To Kill a Mockingbird – but it is hat-tips to Harper Lee’s friend Truman Capote that dominate the film’s opening stretch. Moved to investigate the death of a local girl, 13-year-old protagonist Charlie Bucktin (Levi Miller) picks up In Cold Blood at the library, and minutes later is slipped a copy of Breakfast at Tiffany’s – mysterious note inside – by local Holly Golightly-in-waiting Eliza Wishart (Angourie Rice), the sister of the dead girl.

But it’s Toni Collette, impossibly vivacious as always, who registers most strongly. As Charlie’s mother – bee-hived, eye-shadowed, and straining at the bonds of a dissatisfying marriage – she switches from tenderness to frustration on a dime. One charming scene has her transforming a mini-tantrum in the kitchen into an opportunity to twist and bop to the radio. Shimmying around in a mustard dress, she almost dances away with the film.

Posted on July 21st, 2016 by Frederik

A first teaser trailer for “XXX: The Return of Xander Cage” has been released yesterday and it features a glimpse of Toni’s yet-unnamed character. Click the preview image to watch the teaser. XXX will premiere in the United States on January 20, 2017. You can watch the trailer in the video archive.

Posted on July 6th, 2016 by Frederik

This one has been finished quite fast. Among of Toni’s upcoming films, “Imperium” has been announced last and will be released first – next month already! Here’s some additional tidbits from Vanity Fair: The film follows Daniel Radcliffe as Nate Foster, an idealistic fed who shaves his head and ditches his Harry Potter specs in order to go undercover, by order of an agent played by Toni Collette. (And who can blame him—anyone among us would play neo-Nazi if Toni Collette asked us politely, right?) Once there, he encounters violence, swastikas, and all manner of angry white men; think Death Eaters targeting mudbloods, but, you know, real. The nail-biter of a film—just the latest example of Radcliffe taking on a role that pushes him out of his comfort zone—premieres in theaters and On Demand August 19.

Posted on October 10th, 2015 by Frederik

See that girl, watch that scene, and then watch it over and over again for 21 years. That’s how often we’ve revisited Muriel’s Wedding, the 1994 Australian rom-com-dram which starred Toni Collette — then just an unknown Oz actress with one film credit to her name — as a social misfit named Muriel Heslop, who dreams of one day getting married to a soundtrack by her favorite band, ABBA. Muriel’s rescued from her dreamy, emotional solitude by a charismatic outsider named Rhonda (Rachel Griffiths, in her first film role) and together, they forge a platonic companionship that remains the reason why, more than two decades after its release, we’re still dreaming of the day we can rock out to “Waterloo” with Muriel and Rhonda. The next best thing? EW’s reunion with Collette and Griffiths, who were eager to get together and relive their days in Porpose Spit. The women reunited for our annual Reunions Issue and spilled some fun secrets from their way to the Wedding. Which celebrities have confessed to be Muriel fans? How did the first-time movie director land the rights to ABBA? And why did the movie almost have a different ending?! Read the complete article over at Entertainment Weekly.