Posted on September 8th, 2012 by Frederik

Here’s a new in-depth article on Toni and the upcoming Australian release of “Mental” by The Age Life & Style. From working-class Sydney to Sunset Boulevard is quite a journey, but Toni Collette has made it look easy. Amanda Hooton meets the instinctive actor and hands-on mother who has taken the “t” out of can’t. You can tell Toni Collette is a celebrity because of her hair. It’s blonde (art, not nature) and thick, and it has an excellent kink in it, swinging over her forehead and brushing her cheekbone. Even when celebrities shave their heads – as Collette has done on more than one occasion – you just know the great hair is there, waiting to spring forth again upon an astonished world. Apart from the hair, Toni Collette has turquoise eyes with thick, dark lashes, long teeth, a great figure (including quite a big bottom), and is far friendlier than I expected. Back in the ’90s, she seemed anxious and uncertain, often arriving late to interviews and sounding spiky and defensive. These days, however, she’s famous enough to do hardly any publicity, and perhaps this makes it easier for her to be calm with the journalists she does meet. And given that I manage to fling iced water all over the hotel lounge the moment we meet, and then burp loudly while she’s trying to answer a question a few minutes later, she’s actually under no obligation to be calm at all. But she is. “Burp it up,” she says cheerfully, pointing one long finger, with a short, purple-painted nail, towards my enormous stomach (I blame pregnancy for both aberrations). “Kids are the greatest, greatest thing,” she says. “You love them so much, you just want to …” She mimes a great big bite, as if eating a hamburger. Collette has two children – daughter Sage, 4, and son Arlo, 1 – and she arrived on the set of her latest film, Mental, last June, when Arlo was only nine weeks old. The complete article can be read here.

Posted on April 22nd, 2011 by Frederik

On showtime’s United States of Tara, Toni Collette, 38, plays a peculiar suburban mom who inhabits seven other identities, including a gun-toting guy. We checked in with the eighth version of Collette, the Golden Globe- and Emmy-winning actress herself, pregnant (at press time) with her second child and due in late April, from her home in Sydney.

How did you hide your pregnancy on the show?

By “standing behind large objects. So I’m stirring lots of large pots and carrying lots of plants and books.”

How do you and your husband divide parenting?

Collette and her husband, musician Dave Galafassi, who have recorded an album together, “share everything. My husband is supportive, handsome, a useful human being. He’s a miraculous man. They do exist.”

What misconceptions do we Americans have about Australians?

“We live in the outback with kangaroos and don’t have cosmopolitan cities and lives.”

Posted on March 28th, 2011 by Frederik

Promotion for the third season of “United States of Tara”, which premieres tonight on Showtime, has been quiet – probably due to Toni Collette’s pregnancy. However, USA Today has put together a nice piece on the show including an interview with Toni: It’s one thing to nail an American accent as an Australian. It’s another to master seven of them. And it’s yet something else to do so from more than 7,000 miles away, as Sydney native Toni Collette has done in her role as Tara Gregson, the Kansas housewife and mother with dissociative identity disorder at the heart of Showtime’s United States of Tara. The series returns for a third season Monday night (10:30 ET/PT). No matter that Collette lives Down Under. On Tara, she talks as though she lives down South (as beer-swilling, motorcycle-cruising, Y-chromosome-owning Buck), downtown (as Noo Yawk feminist therapist Shoshana Schoenbaum) and down in some Midwestern basement (as gum-snapping, ponytailed, teenage T). And those are only three of Tara’s alter egos. Collette, 38, has never worked with a dialect coach on the show. She credits her uncanny — and Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning — ability to inhabit thoroughly Yankee characters so convincingly to “a misspent youth watching too much American television.” But her talent for drawling twangs and nasally honks aside, “I’m attracted to roles that have a sense of truth to them and a sense of universality to the story,” regardless of geography and demography, Collette says.

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Posted on February 25th, 2011 by Frederik

The Australian has recently interviewed Toni Collette in their 10 questions section.

Many scenes from your films are indelible. Your character Lynn in The Sixth Sense bursting into tears in the car as her son (Haley Joel Osment) says he has spoken to her dead mother. Muriel’s Wedding, in which you joyously stride down the aisle with that fantastic Cheshire cat grin on your face. That powerful scene in The Hours, in which Kitty’s bubbly façade momentarily drops away and she falls into the arms of Laura (Julianne Moore). Are scenes like this all about instinct – or burn-the-midnight oil rehearsal? I prefer less rehearsal and more thought before a scene. I’m open to rehearsing if my collaborators are that way inclined. But most people waste the time playing stupid and fruitless games. Literally. I have only worked with a couple of directors who really use the rehearsal period in a beneficial way. Generally, if I am truly meant to play a character I have an instant alignment with the scene and the way it’s to be played as soon as I read it. I can see and feel it as I read it for the first time. It gets me all stirred up and excited. So rehearsing can feel like it gets in the way of an honest moment one might want to save for the camera.

The Academy Awards are on this weekend. Do you enjoy the big award shows like the Oscars and the Emmys? Yes, from home. I always have. But most are too long, wouldn’t you say? They’re also fun in reality but too nerve-wracking to be entirely enjoyable.

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Posted on February 1st, 2011 by Frederik

Article courtesy USA Today. Americans know all about the impressive acting chops of Oscar nominees (and past winners) Nicole Kidman and Geoffrey Rush. Which is why fellow Aussie Toni Collette is happy that another countrywoman, 63-year-old supporting actress nominee Jacki Weaver, is getting her due stateside.

She is an Australian legend and no one’s really known her outside Australia, so I’m absolutely thrilled for her,” Collette, 38, tells USA TODAY’s Olivia Barker. “It’s really encouraging for older actors also to know that this can happen at a later stage in your career.

The very pregnant Collette was “bummed” to have missed this year’s Globes. She was up again for the best TV series actress, musical or comedy award for her role on Showtime’s United States of Tara, whose third season premieres March 28 (Collette lost out to Laura Linney). Her bursting belly – she’s due this spring – was only part of the reason for her absence. “I could not foresee myself gathering the energy and getting back on a plane for 14 hours,” says Collette, who already has a daughter, Sage, 3. Her character Tara Gregson, however, won’t be adding to her brood of two: The pregnancy wasn’t written into the show. “It’s just a matter of standing behind large objects,” says Collette, who was about five months along by the time shooting wrapped. And like with many second pregnancies, she started showing sooner. “So I’m stirring lots of large pots in the kitchen and carrying lots of plants and books.” As for the alleged Hollywood baby boom she’s a part of, Collette chalks some of it up to media hype. Still,

Perhaps it is a sign of the time we are living in,” she says. “It used to be common for women to become stay-at-home mums, forced to make a decision between motherhood and the workplace. These days women can actually do it all, so younger female actors are more present in all states of womanhood.

Posted on October 25th, 2010 by Frederik

Lots of new magazines scans have been added to the image library, ranging from 1995 to 2010! For an overview of all latest uploads, click the previews below. Enjoy reading!