Posted on June 5th, 2018 by Frederik

Here’s a great interview with Ari Aster and Toni Collette by Time Out New York: Outside: a thick snowfall. An icy midnight silence. But if you were in the theater during that shivery January weekend when Hereditary first traumatized its Sundance audiences, you were surrounded by a riot of noises. They mostly came from those of us in the crowd: low moans of dread exploding into full-throated shrieks, then laughter at how completely owned we were. A hypnotic stretch of stillness, followed by a quiet, John Carpenter–worthy reveal (and a wave of impressed applause). Finally, afterward, loading into the festival bus in a stunned, post-film daze, one perverse viewer clucked his tongue—a recurring motif in the movie—and everybody jumped. “Thanks a lot,” someone groused. “The hyperbole has been fun to soak in,” admits 31-year-old writer-director Ari Aster, responding to the praise that’s mushroomed around his feature debut, a supernatural nightmare about a suburban family’s descent into hell. “I think that’s probably not healthy,” he adds quickly. “I wasn’t aiming to make a horror landmark—I was aiming to make a horror film that I would like. Because I haven’t liked any in a long time.” Over a few beers at April’s genre-centric Overlook Film Festival in New Orleans, where Hereditary also killed, Aster is a sweet guy, prone to shy smiles, thoughtful pauses and self-deprecation. He’s somebody who listens to Martin Scorsese interviews on his iPhone, a geek who’d rather chat about Criterion Blu-rays than opening grosses. The complete interview can be read here.

Posted on May 31st, 2018 by Frederik

The Los Angeles Times has published a terrific article and interview with Toni Collette today. An excerpt can be read below and the full article is available on their website. Toni Collette wasn’t looking for darkness when “Hereditary” came calling. But when the darkness found her – in the form of the unnerving saga of the Grahams, an American family haunted by tragedy, mental illness, and perhaps something supernatural – the opportunity was too delicious to pass up. “I wasn’t interested in doing anything heavy, but I picked up the script and I couldn’t stop reading it,” the Australian native explained one May morning, slipping into the same busy Westside eatery where, just over a year ago, writer-director Ari Aster convinced her to take the plunge and play a woman who begins to unlock cryptic family secrets after the death of her own estranged mother. The result, a claustrophobic chiller that distributor A24 releases June 8, features one of the most dynamic and memorable performances of Collette’s career, in what critics are calling the scariest film in years. Collette’s Annie Graham is many things. A miniatures artist who fills her home studio with dioramas of her own life, she recreates memories as a means of reclaiming control. A mother of two with a strained relationship with her own mom, she is overprotective of one of her children, and coldly resentful of the other. And when the unthinkable strikes, she struggles to cope with a sense of powerlessness that gives way to relentless dread as Aster spins his crumbling, nightmarish narrative.

Posted on May 19th, 2018 by Frederik

Toni Collette graces the cover of Sunday’s Stellar Magazine in Australia. Subscribers to their site can read it online. Here’s a snippet from the Daily Mail: Toni Collette has revealed how she has balanced motherhood with her Hollywood acting career. The 45-year-old described juggling both acting and family life as ‘maddening’ at times, during her interview with Stellar. ‘But it’s worth it in the end because, as I say, both areas of my life are really, really important to me,’ she said. More bits can be read here. Also, Britain’s Empire Magazine has a great Summer Movie guide with a great review on “Hereditary” and a special on past and recent horror classics. Edit: I’ve added scans from both Stellar Magazine and the Australian Sunday Times to the photo gallery, both run the same article but with different pictures.


Posted on October 28th, 2017 by Frederik

It’s very quiet right now in Collette-land, which is more than fine after all the film we’ve seen released this year – and some upcoming buzz once “Please Stand By” premieres at the festival circuit later this month. In the meantime, here are scans from the October issue of the Australian Muse Magazine. Enjoy.

Posted on February 23rd, 2017 by Frederik

“Those doors would never be opening now were it not for Muriel’s Wedding,” Toni Collette says in an interview with Stellar. The Blacktown-born star said that she still gets stopped in the street by fans of the film who say ‘you’re terrible Muriel’, more than two decades after it first hit the big screen. She said that playing the repressed, underdog character who became the unlikely heroine changed her life. ‘It’s pretty incredible that a film has stayed with people on such a deep level,’ she said. Reminiscing her early days film the 1994 hit, she said she enjoyed the process of making the film without contemplating what would happen next. From there Toni had a succession of roles that catapulted her into international recognition with films such as The Sixth Sense, In Her Shoes, and Little Miss Sunshine. In late 2015, she returned to Australia to film Jasper Jones in Pemberton, WA. The coming-of-age movie sees the actress play the mother of a young boy from a small mining town who finds himself in a moral dilemma in 1960s Australia, which is set for release in March. The full interview can be read over at the Daily Telegraph’s Stellar website.

Posted on February 9th, 2017 by Frederik

sbjctjournal has posted a wonderful interview with Toni Collette featuring an AMAAAZING new photoshoot. Head over to their site to read the full article. Award-winning actress Toni Collette arrives straight from Canada, where she just wrapped up one film. She’s got two premiering at Sundance, and a third coming out in March. But the stereotype of egocentric Hollywood actress-on-the-go doesn’t quite fit this thoughtful, quirky soul. Toni is someone who is deeply aware of her relationship to nature, humanity, and to the planet itself. She talks to sbjct about the fact that nobody exists in a bubble; we are all connected, and we are all part of the human collective.

I think we’re all living at such a pace that just creates ignorance. I think until you have some space and some time and some silence, you don’t actually absorb the context of your life. And if you start to look at your existence, and you start to look at the world and the imbalance of the types of lives being lived and the types of experiences being had, you can’t help but want to help other people. I think it’s awareness. And I think we live in a time and in a society that is driven by things that really are not a priority, and the things that are important are often overlooked, and once you connect with those, it will ultimately give you a much richer life. And a deeper appreciation of what you have.